Category Archives: Uncategorized

Pacific-slope Flycatcher Nest

June 26: This was the day that we noticed the nest being built on top of the light in our front entry way. Our first thought was a swallow because we have a lot of them flying around our neighbourhood though most would have nested weeks earlier.

June 28: We noticed a bird sitting on the nest so I got out my camera and we discovered a Pacific-slope Flycatcher (whose 4-letter species ID is PSFL) sitting on the nest. Here is the picture that I took:

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Consulting with Birds of North America Online (BNA-online) I discovered that first broods occur in April or May but some pairs will attempt a second nest around June or July. This was clearly round 2 for these birds.

June 30: I got up on a step-stool, held my iPhone 4s above the nest and took a picture:

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The PSFL was sitting on 3 eggs. Consulting BNA-online again I found out that the most common number of eggs is 4 followed by 3 so we might have a full nest or there may be more to come.

July 2: Only 2 days after the first picture, I took a second and discovered that there were still 3 eggs.

July 5: Another 3 days and there were still only 3 eggs to the bird sitting on the nest was probably incubating the eggs. BNA-online indicated typical incubation periods of 13 to 16 days so, assuming that my first ‘egg picture’ indicated the start of incubation then we should expect the eggs to hatch between July 12 and 15.

July 11: A picture from my iPhone shows that the eggs have hatched:

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The three ‘grubs’ in the nest look pretty helpless so they must have hatched quite recently.  I decided to call July 11 hatch-day 0.

Here is my first video of the adults coming and going, bringing food to the nestlings.

There will be many more videos and pictures to come as the nestlings grow up and fledge. I just hope that they all make it to fly away risking the odds of survival which are not in their favour — I’ve heard that only about one in ten birds survive a year after hatching.

Unexpected Finds at Buttertubs Marsh

I was birding Buttertub Marsh with a friend last Thursday (November 17, 2016). We were scanning the almost empty pond for waterfowl when Leonel noticed 4 Great Fronted Geese hanging out with some Canada Geese at the far side of the pond. It was the first time that I had seen them there.

Here’s a picture captured with my Panasonic FZ-200 at maximum zoom. It’s cropped as well. You can also see a bird in front just to the right of centre with a neck-band as well. I’ll say more on this guy later.

GWFG at Buttertub Marsh

Four Greater White-fronted geese mixed with some Canada Geese at Buttertub Marsh on November 17, 2016.

About and hour and a half later we were just about done and noticed the Canada Geese swimming more in the middle of the pond without the GWFG. It was Leonel’s good eyes and my FZ-200 to the rescue a second time. The 4 geese were across the pond on the edge of the pond resting, their coloration blending in well with the background reeds.

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VIU Canada Goose Project

I said that I’d come back to that Canada Goose with a neck band in the first picture.

A group from VIU, headed by student Stew Pearce, banded 200 Canada Geese earlier this year and has been following the locations where they have been seen since using information sent in by birders or anyone else interested in helping out. The goal is to learn how the birds move about during the year. You can find out more by going to the VIU Canada Goose Project web-site.

Stew told me recently that geese from the project have been seen and reported from as far away as Portland, Oregon. So, if you happen to see a Canada Goose with a neck band let Stew know using the instructions at the above link.

So, did I figure out what the ID of our find was? Yup! We saw the bird swimming behind some reeds an hour or so after our first encounter and I took a some pictures as the goose swam in and out of view. One of the four was clear enough to ID the goose:

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Our goose’s ID was “096P”. I checked the web-site and discovered that the most recent sighting was November 6 at Buttertubs Marsh. I’m guessing that this guy is not going South this winter.

 

I’m Back

I haven’t posted here in quite a while – about a year in fact.  Here are my excuses:

  1. I have a habit of writing long, researched works that can take weeks to finish.
  2. I have a secret longtime desire to try my hand at writing fiction that I finally decided to act upon.
  3. I got caught up in the Canadian federal election campaign as a Green Party volunteer.
  4. I have been spending too much time on FaceBook where it is all to easy to just share-and-comment rather than create original content.

I’m going to (try to) write some fiction…

As part of my interest in writing fiction attended the Surrey International Writer’s Conference (SIWC) this past weekend.  On the subject of becoming a published writer, one recommendation that I received more than once was that I need to have an active online presence in the social media (blogs, Facebook, Twitter, etc).  Obviously the social media and the fiction should share the same field/genre.

The content that I publish in social media would, I was told, help define my brand.

I can do that.

But, what is my field/genre.  The best description that I can come up with is:  Speculative (science) fiction influenced by global social and environmental issues.

PonderTerra, my other main WordPress blog, should nicely fit this target field/genre.

Another recommendation that received more than once was that it is better to write lots of small, regular posts rather than an occasional long ones.  Oops!  Guilty!  I clearly need to improve in this department on all my blogs.

So prepare to see more regular posts here and on PonderTerra.  And if the fiction writing goes well, look for updates in both blogs as well.

KHH

Link

This is a follow-up to a previous post summarizing the September 2013 issue of Avian Conservation & Ecology that features several articles with the theme of human-related bird mortality in Canada.

A thread on one of the birding groups that I follow was discussing the effect of wind power on birds and one of the contributors pointed to the Barnard on Wind web site (creator: Mike Barnard).  More specifically they referenced the article: How significant is bird and bat mortality due to wind turbines?  This article, along with its extensive list of references, contains a wealth of information for anyone interested in understanding the effects of wind-power on bird populations.  One of the references in Mike’s article is, in fact, the same article on the effects of wind-power that is referenced by the September issue of Avian Conservation &Ecology.

It’s a great and informative site that’s definitely worth a bookmark.